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Fragmentation and stability of circadian activity rhythms predict mortality

Onderzoeksgroep Van Someren
Publicatiejaar 2015
Gepubliceerd in American Journal of Epidemiology
Auteur(s) Eus Van Someren ,

Circadian rhythms and sleep patterns change as people age. Little is known about the associations between circadian rhythms and mortality rates. We investigated whether 24-hour activity rhythms and sleep characteristics independently predicted mortality. Actigraphy was used to determine the stability and fragmentation of the 24-hour activity rhythm in 1,734 persons (aged 45-98 years) from the Rotterdam Study (2004-2013). Sleep was assessed objectively using actigraphy and subjectively using sleep diaries to estimate sleep duration, sleep onset latency, and waking after sleep onset. The mean follow-up time was 7.3 years; 154 participants (8.9%) died. Sleep measures were not related to mortality after adjustment for health parameters. In contrast, a more stable 24-hour activity rhythm was associated with a lower mortality risk (per 1 standard deviation, hazard ratio = 0.83, 95% confidence interval: 0.71, 0.96), and a more fragmented rhythm was associated with a higher mortality risk (per 1 standard deviation, hazard ratio = 1.22, 95% confidence interval: 1.04, 1.44). Low stability and high fragmentation of the 24-hour activity rhythm predicted all-cause mortality, whereas estimates from actigraphy and sleep diaries did not. Disturbed circadian activity rhythms reflect age-related alterations in the biological clock and could be an indicator of disease.

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